Is it better to have a distinctive business name or one that is easy to spell?

Mamou-Mani speaks to people in a certain way. The sonority – the way the sound of the name appeals to people – delivers the foundation for your brand to deliver its message. You can call it appeal, stickyness or catchyness: it is what the other name does not have.

The principles against which you should test your brand names at this stage:

1. Is it catchy? Does it stick with people?

2. Does it go nicely with most of the branding conventions in your particular niche of business?

3. Does it break with a few of them (helps raise stickyness)?

4. Are there bad connotations or feelings associated with your brand?

5. Are there good connotations or feelings associated with your brand?

6. Is there still some free web equity for your brand in the channels that you will use to reach your audience?

If you score high on most of these questions, you might be on a good route.

Keep in mind that I do not perform intense research for Quora Questions (after all, I am in consulting), so the following might be sketchy and unverified.

So, let's run the test:

1. Is it catchy? Does it stick with people?
It sure is catchy, but I can't tell from here if it will stick with people. That you will have to test.

2. Does it go nicely with most of the branding conventions in your particular niche of business?
Name plus 'Architects'? Check.

3. Does it break with a few of them (helps raise stickyness)?
Not really from my perspective, but the sonority of your name (as Mike Nardine states correctly, it runs "trippingly on the tongue") gives it a particular flavor.

4. Are there bad connotations or feelings associated with your brand?
Don't see any from here. But you should always do some research on that. I once had a client whose name was also the name of a particularly fierce dictator, and something like that just 'might' hurt your business a bit.

5. Are there good connotations or feelings associated with your brand?
I see none so far.

6. Is there still some free web equity for your brand in the channels that you will use to reach your audience?
Important. Research that if you haven't already.

So far it looks like your brand is on a good route.

And btw: I find Manou-Mani distinctive as well as easy to spell. A little tip at the end: make sure you buy web equity for misspellings, too and redirect them. Simple as that.

See the answer on Quora:

Is it better to have a distinctive business name or one that is easy to spell?

Zero Dollar Budget for Startup Marketing: Myth or Real?

Zero dollar budget for startup marketing:

Real.

  1. Build a great product that creates buzz because of its huge benefits for customers and its great (product/UI/UX/web) design. Build social into your product so that it can provide its own virality.
  2. Brand wisely, with an emphasis on simplicity and focus, do the same in the creation of your communication units (PR messages, blog articles, inhouse product videos etc.).
  3. Get the word out by applying a pull strategy, concentrate on word-of-mouth, PR and inherent product marketing.

There are many more channels and ways to advertise without even touching your budget; I have chosen to keep it simple for this list.

Zero dollar cost for startup marketing:

Myth.

Correlation:
The less budget you want to spend on marketing, the more it will cost you in terms of hard labor. A beneficial way therefore is to try an 'almost zero dollar cost' strategy, if your funds are very low. But realize this one fact: promotional pressure can be applied in the most easy way by strongly advertising for a lot of money, and sometimes (e.g. if you do not have a significant advantage over all of your competitors) it can be a necessity.

See the answer on Quora:

Zero Dollar Budget for Startup Marketing: Myth or Real?

What are some examples of applications where tablets and smartphones have/might replace dedicated display/input mechanisms?

THE IPAD

Applications:

  • Browsing the web: if you have an iPad, you almost fully stop doing it on your desktop (especially now that iOS 6 and Google Chrome are out)
  • Handheld console gaming
  • Standalone console gaming (the iPad may not have come very far on that route, yet, but it is on its way, as this article, among others, suggests: http://www.theverge.com/2012/6/2…)
  • Medical documentation and assessment, patient care (http://medcitynews.com/2011/11/5…)
  • Interactive information displays: Museums use this a lot already: the iPad is being put into a case that locks the Home button, therefore only displaying the content that it should display; another good example is McDonald's using it as an info display/surf station in its fancier restaurants.
  • Small/children's room television sets: Many people already use the iPad as a second (third, fourth) TV; something that people used an HTPC and a display or a standalone PC in a kid's room for before.
  • Blogging/publishing/writing: I know a few people who have already adapted to the zero feedback of the keyboard of the iPad and are almost ten-fingers quick at typing their content.
  • Textbooks/learning: From iBooks to proprietary apps, there are a lot of learning institutions encompassing the iPad into their learning/distribution of learning materials.
  • Children's entertainment and learning: There are already thousands of edutainment apps for preschoolers out there.
  • Consumer photo editing: Once the domain of simple Paint-like programs, then a mass adoption of basic Photoshop started, iPhoto took over and now it's iPhoto on the iPad. AI allows edits which were much too complex for beginners just a couple of years ago (even with great input devices) and consumers embrace it – without needing input devices.
  • Social networking: Sounds almost a bit too obvious, but ask anyone who uses both Facebook and an iPad – they'll tell you that they almost never switch on their computers to do some Facebook.
  • Note taking: As basic as it is, would we have believed if anyone would have told us seven years ago that in the near future we would not use a keyboard or a pencil anymore for taking notes? (Thanks, Evernote!)
  • Document display: Before tablets, dedicated display/input systems were the only ones you could use to display a presentation or a PDF to someone at work. Now that that's changed, tablets are taking over.
  • Information search: Very close to the browsing I wrote about above, it's obvious that many people are turning to apps when they look for information, rather than using a traditional PC with a browser – Wikipedia is a good example.
  • Shopping online: Before Tablets (and smartphones), there was no other way to enter your information than to use a traditional display/input system. Today, eBay already makes about 10 billion dollars from mobile purchases (http://allthingsd.com/20120718/e…). One reason for this is that for an online shopping experience to satisfying, a beautiful and 'haptic' experience is way more important than fluent text input.

I could go on like this for ages, but maybe I am just a mobile enthusiast…(,

See the answer on Quora:

What are some examples of applications where tablets and smartphones have/might replace dedicated display/input mechanisms?

How much of an effect will my domain name have on marketing strategies and generating business solely via e-commerce? All the top ranked extensions are taken.

Question details:

"clothing line called "monkey see, monkey do" and there are only 3 extensions left – not very good ones.  does the extension make that big of a difference or should i not focus on it?  or should i consider changing my brand's name which i actually love and have had for a few years now?"

I see a way for you to keep your brand name and get a decent top level domain. You can do this by playing with the second level domain name without forsaking you brand name. Pocket, the service formerly known as ReadItLater, is a good example (getpocket.com) Consider

  1. Abbreviations like msmd, msmdclothing
  2. Verbal extensions like buymonkeyseemonkeydo
  3. Noun extensions like shopmonkeyseemonkeydo
  4. Playful extensions like monkeyseemonkeydomonkeyshop (long URL names can have great appeal in some industries, the clothing industry is a perfect fit)

And try to go with a .com top level domain.

Please note that I did not perform any WHOIS availability searches.

Feel free to ask if you need more suggestions or have any questions.

See the answer on Quora:

How much of an affect will my domain name be on marketing strategies and generating business solely via an e-commerce? all the top ranked extensions are taken?

When I read about inventions and ideas, I see that many of the responses say to “execute” in order to gain the attention of VCs. What are s

In a small small nutshell:

  1. Refine your business model, sketch up a minimum viable product (MVP).
  2. Build and offer the MVP, test and record market response. If it does not gain significant traction, change your model/product, until it does or let it be.
  3. If it gains significant traction, talk to the investors. Tell them that you need money to scale and execute the product fully.

If you need more advice on how to go from idea to business model to MVP, just ask.

See the answer on Quora:

When I read about inventions and ideas, I see that many of the responses say to “execute” in order to gain the attention of VCs.  What are some tips for this execution process?

How far is ePub from being the de facto standard for publishing in the eLearning industry?

The e-learning industry is an enormous, decentralized and definitely still very heterogenous one. There are no definitive go-to sources, yet, even though some players in the industry like Apple are shifting large amounts of money into R&D&M (research and development and marketing) to change that.

You are asking about ePub becoming the de facto standard for e-learning. In fact, there are so many standards and formats out there still, that I think the consolidation process of standards has just begun.

First of all, ePub is of course only highly relevant for text publishing (you might want to think about rephrasing your question), and e-learning consists of all media types. For instance, large amounts of media out there are either mixed-media or video.

Secondly, format standards or standard consolidation depends highly on the publishers and distributors. For now, it seems that most of them are still trying to diversify their format portfolio rather than to consolidate it. Apple iTunes U is a good example, providing support for multiple video and audio formats, as well as PDF and ePub text publishing (source: http://deimos.apple.com/rsrc/doc…).

Finally, all e-businesses are innovation driven businesses, and ePub still has a way to go before it is able to fully compete with more established (not open) formats in every necessary way.

See the answer on Quora:

How far is ePub from being the de facto standard for publishing in the eLearning industry?

Is Quora the new Google?

If everything goes well,
Quora might be what shows on Google when you enter a question in the search box. And on Bing. And on Yahoo.

Important note: Google has been working on their solution of semantic search, the Knowledge Graph, for years. Others, like Bing, are working on semantic search, too. Quora has the potential to fit right in. In the web world of tomorrow (and yesterday, actually) what we need are answers, not search results. If Quora SEOs the heck out of this website, that might just be their largest benefit. And yes, that might also make it a Wikipedia alternative. But to get to that point, it will have to diversify its portfolio of topics and answers far more than it has to date.

So no, there is no David vs. Goliath question here, and Quora is not the new Google. There is more of a David-in-symbiosis-with-Goliath-thing starting to emerge…

See the answer on Quora:

Is Quora the new Google?